Bake the damn cake

So you won’t bake a cake for a gay wedding, but you bake one for other weddings.

Is it because the “sin” is obvious? Two men together or two women together are clear to see. Easy to discriminate. But it’s okay to bake a cake for an adulterer’s wedding because you can’t see if they’re sinning. If you’re going to deny people your cake-baking services based on your perception of their sin, then you should get out of business. Because every time you bake a wedding cake, you’re baking it for a sinner. According to the logic of not baking a cake for gays, you’re endorsing every one of the sins of any of your customers because you’re taking part in one of their life celebrations.

How did Jesus treat sinners? He loved them. Did he turn them away from his presence? No, he loved them. In the face of all their sin. In fact, he sent their accusers away shame-faced.

If you’re a Christian, you should go out of your way to show love toward anyone who comes into your business. If you’re following Jesus, you should be willing to shed your blood for anyone who comes into your business.

Show people love. Accept them simply as human beings. Their sin has nothing to do with you. Jesus did more than bake a cake for sinners. He bled for them. He died for them.

This is how Jesus shows love for sinners. How dare he endorse all that sin by showing love?!

This is how Jesus shows love for sinners. How dare he endorse all that sin by showing love?!

Lucky Chance

I can’t remember the circumstance that prompted it, but I recently had the classic Christianese thought: “There but by the grace of God, go I.” It means, if God hadn’t put me in such a good life, I could be where that unfortunate person is.

It was probably in my head due to thinking about ISIS and the horrors of extremist religious oppression. Knowing what a rule-follower I was as a child all the way into my early thirties, I thought if I’d been born into that extremist Islamic culture, I would be one of those women who was all about following the rules I was taught unquestioningly. I might be waving a gun around, patrolling the streets looking for rule-breakers, and cheering on horrific acts. There but by the grace of God…

Or I might’ve been thinking about Liberia and the Ebola outbreak where people don’t have access to the same excellent health care I do. Where they have to hide the fact they or their family members might be sick so that they aren’t ostracized. There but by the grace of God, go I.

But now I’m questioning that, simply because I know God loves us all perfectly and equally. Is it really loving to pick and choose which soul gets born into a safer, clean environment, and which gets born into a slum? Or is it kinder for God to allow chance to take place, to allow for blind luck?

Am I blessed? Or am I just lucky? I think the latter may be more fair from a Christian point of view. God may know when a sparrow falls, but it doesn’t say he chooses which sparrow will fall.

If I am not blessed, if I am just lucky, some of my specialness is taken away. That may be a good thing. It doesn’t change God’s love for me if I was not specially chosen to have the privileged life I do. But it can introduce more humility into my heart. These days I feel more lucky than blessed. And I don’t think God’s offended at all by that.

Because LIFE!

There’s a debate going on these days about whether or not it is okay to tell fat people or fat children that they are just fine the way they are. There’s this odd fear that if you do so, you’ll be condoning their “self-destructive” behavior…that shaming or constantly reminding them of their need to change is the only way to move them towards “health.”

Sounds a lot like the fundamentalist Christian attitude toward the LGBT community, but I digress.

Here’s the deal. No one has any right to tell another person how to live their life. No one has any right to shame another person based on their looks.

I am 5’6″ tall and weigh 213 pounds. I waver between a size 16 and 18. And I’m done trying to be something I’m not.

In the past week, I’ve begun choosing joy. I’ve begun looking for happiness in the body that I’m in, rather than hoping for happiness once I’ve changed. There’s no time for that; life is now! I have a trip to London coming up that I’ve been dreaming of since I was a kid. I couldn’t care less what my body looks like for it. I’m not going there to impress anyone. I’m going there to BE. IN. LONDON.

To just be. That is the point of life. To be you. And if you’re fat, be joyous. Why? Because you’re alive, you’re living, and there’s no one else out there that can live it like you.

And let’s look at the lean community’s blatant double-standard. They are so afraid of accepting fat people as they are because being overweight could shorten that person’s lifespan. So…what’s with all these extreme sports? How many lean people die every year from their dangerous sporting choices? A lean body doesn’t do you any good when something goes wrong on your base jump. But such obviously dangerous life choices are okayed and the newly-dead are celebrated because, as their grieving friends will say, “They died doing what they love.”

If we are supposed to celebrate someone who reveled in life-threatening behavior because it gave them joy, then stop staring judgmentally at the fat person enjoying an ice cream cone. You have no idea who they have helped, how much they are loving those who need it, and what contribution they are bringing to society in ways that have nothing to do with their size.

Life is to be lived as each individual chooses to live it. It doesn’t matter when you die as long as you’ve lived your life to your satisfaction.

Comfort

This sounds cliché but I am working hard on letting myself just be myself. I’m a plus size woman and have struggled with my weight all my life. Then I see strong, healthy people like Paul Walker get killed in a car crash and I think, “What did all that fitness do for him in the end?” All this energy and thought time we spend on fretting over our bodies…for what? A few extra years at the end of our life that we are not even guaranteed? I think what is really important (despite that darned desire to just fit in) is that we are giving love and receiving love. I mean, really, if that is happening, if love is happening in our lives then our jeans size begins to shrink in importance, if not in reality. :) It’s hard. It takes fighting decades of ingrained thought processes that make me see myself in pieces and parts instead of how I see my friends and loved ones: as whole people. Their body size is of so little importance to me; I want to see myself that way, too. It takes a huge burden off to let that go. And is a great comfort.

Brightness

I’ve had several reminders lately to enjoy life and let go of the things that are unimportant such as my weight or broken dreams. I’m worrying less about making sure I get “my time,” instead looking for activities that fulfill me. Did you know they have roller skating at the Town Toyota Center these days? Oh, happy day. :)

This little video was just one of the things that has gotten me thinking this way. Enjoy!

A God of Torture, or a God of Love?

How do I even talk with Christian friends any more who see God as nothing more than a rulemonger? As someone who only wants to save a chosen few of humanity and spend His eternity with the full understanding and feeling of the majority of humanity suffering endless torment? Have they really thought that through? Do they understand that He will experience the agony of His creations suffering forever? HOW IS THAT LOVE? How is that love for Himself or for the tortured? Continue reading

Confidence

Confidence is a funny thing and hard to come by. I often worry and fear that the things I do or the choices I make are inherently flawed simply because, well, they’re from me. Where that comes from, I’m not sure, but I am working on overcoming it. I was really encouraged today by Greg from the “Inappropriate Conversations” podcast who gave “Greetings from Nowhere” such a great shout out.

It’s good to remember that we are all just stumbling along in our lives, doing our best to be ourselves and live in the moment. So, every day I walk a little taller. And so should you.

What the heck does “theory” mean anyway?

I got into discussion with my fellow commentors on the www.johnshore.com blog regarding my belief in a created universe. I stated that once science began calling evolution fact rather than theory, I would do so as well. (For the record, I don’t have a problem with evolution. God can create in any way they choose.)

Well! I got an education on the word “theory” and what it means in popular understanding versus what it means in the scientific community. One poster pointed out that gravity is also a theory, but that didn’t make it any less fact. Couldn’t really argue with that. I discovered that the dictionary defines “theory” in several different ways, including both referencing theory as fact as well as theory as an unproved idea or concept.

Allie, a fellow commentor on the blog, gave me a great, layman’s definition which finally made sense to my brain:

“What you thought was a theory is actually scientifically known as a “hypothesis.”  Theory = proven, within the limits of science, which accepts that things regarded as proven today may come unraveled tomorrow. Hypothesis = what ordinary people call a theory.”

That helps me a ton! Thanks, Allie!